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24 February 2008 / erikduval

SciVee … Science 2.0?

I’ve blogged before about the need for science2.0, i.e. to apply the snowflake effect to science.

From the news track on the February issue of the CACM comes a nice development in this direction:

SciVee.com, funded by the National Science Foundation, is the latest in a growing number of video-sharing startups designed to let scientists broadcast themselves working in the lab or delivering lectures. The media outlet encourages scholars with new research papers to make short videos, or pubcasts, highlighting their key points. The Associated Press reports fans of the niche sites say they help the public—and students—understand the scientific process, while allowing researchers to duplicate one another’s results and discourage fraud. Journal editors are quick to caution the leap to video will not displace the practice of reporting scientific results in peer-reviewed journals or at scientific conferences anytime soon. Most journals with online editions are taking a wait-and-see approach about YouTube-type videos, though many routinely add podcasts and other media to accompany papers. Says Stewart Wills, online editor of Science: “This is an area we’re extremely interested in, but we’re still in the embryonic stage.”

I am not sure that it is a good idea to start a new, separate platform for video, specifically for scientists. I’d feel more comfortable if this would be part of the youtube or blip universe, but I’m happy with any experiment in this domain!

Actually, ACM is trying even harder: the “Technical Interest Service” alerts you about new publications that may be of interest – today, I was pointed to David Parnas’s call to stop the numbers game in publications, and Ben Shneiderman’s article on creativity support tools – both VERY relevant to my research and thus quite useful. (In this case, I already knew about both papers, but this still shows how useful and relevant these suggestions can be!)

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